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Halloween treats from around the world

By JoFriday 30th October 2015

Peda, just one of India’s many sweets  - Image by Flickr user Abhinaba Basu Peda, just one of India’s many sweets - Image by Flickr user Abhinaba Basu

Halloween is a fun-tastic time of year for children, what with the fancy dress costumes, trick-or-treating, and the seemingly never-ending supply of sweets. The popular tradition of going from door to door, asking “trick or treat?”, dates back to the Middle Ages when people would ask for food in return for prayers – it sure has come a long way since then!

In celebration of Halloween and all its sugary goodness, we’re taking a look at sweet treats from around the world, as well as a simple vanilla fudge recipe that you and the kids can make at home. Yum!

Osmanli Macunu

Osmanli Macunu is a traditional Turkish sweet, originating in the Ottoman Empire, which is made from brightly coloured ribbons of flavoured syrup, served on the end of a wooden skewer. Street vendors craft each sweet individually, heating different syrups and twirling small amounts of each around the skewer, before finishing with lemon or orange juice. The finished product resembles an oversized lollipop, and is sure to delight those with a sweet tooth.

Peda

If you’re looking to try all kinds of different sweet treats, India is the place to go. Sweets are a big part of Indian culture and you’ll find many sweet shops with row upon row of tempting candy. Peda is a combination of khoa (a dairy product, similar to ricotta), sugar and flavourings – such as cardamom, pistachios and saffron – shaped into bitesize balls. While you can eat these delicious treats all year round, Peda are often given as religious offerings.

Pé-de-moleque

Salty and sweet Pé-de-moleque, simply delicious – Image by Flickr user Casa Fora do Eixo Minas Salty and sweet Pé-de-moleque, simply delicious – Image by Flickr user Casa Fora do Eixo Minas Salty and sweet is always a winner, and Brazil combines the two perfectly in Pé-de-moleque. This delectable treat is jam-packed with peanuts and rapadura (solid, unrefined cane sugar), mixed together and poured out to cool into a hard sheet of tasty goodness. Essentially, it’s Brazil’s version of peanut brittle. Pé-de-moleque translates to ‘boy’s foot’, a reference to the cobbled streets in Brazil, which were made by laying large rocks on top of sand. Street children would flatten these rocks by stamping on them, giving them an appearance similar to this peanut treat, and so the name was born.

Cuberdon

Visitors to Belgium are in for a real treat with this unique, cone-shaped candy. Made from gum Arabic and raspberry flavouring, and traditionally coloured purple, Cuberdon is hard on the outside and gooey on the inside, making for a wonderful taste sensation. In Dutch, these sweets are commonly known as neus (nose), neuzeke (little nose) or Ghent neus (Ghent nose) due to their nose-like shape. No matter what you decide to call them, remember to eat them within three weeks or the insides will crystallize, which is the reason they’re not available outside of the country. Cuberdon can be found at sweetshops throughout Belgium – Image by Flickr user Philippe Cuberdon can be found at sweetshops throughout Belgium – Image by Flickr user Philippe

Easy vanilla fudge recipe

Ingredients

450g Granulated sugar

150ml Milk

175g Evaporated milk

85g Butter

Vanilla essence

Vegetable oil for greasing

Method 

1. Gently heat the sugar, butter and both types of milk, stirring frequently until the sugar has dissolved.

2. Bring the mixture to the boil, stirring occasionally to make sure it doesn’t stick.

3. Use a sugar thermometer to gauge the temperature and when it reaches 116°C remove from the heat and stir in the vanilla. If you don’t have a thermometer, add a small dollop of the mixture to cold water. If it’s the right temperature it will form a ball.

4. Lightly grease a shallow square dish (roughly 18cm), and pour the mixture in. Leave to cool for 10-15 minutes, then cut into squares and leave to cool completely.

Making fudge at home is easy, so why not give it a go? – Image by Flickr user  Alexandra E Rust Making fudge at home is easy, so why not give it a go? – Image by Flickr user Alexandra E Rust

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